Home About Our Work Resources Careers Contact Us

What is Domestic Violence?


Domestic violence includes any type of physical, emotional, sexual or financial abuse. It can be perpetrated by your partner, any family member (natal or matrimonial), or a combination thereof.



You can also email us at [email protected].

Recognising Domestic Violence


Domestic violence can take many forms, including physical, emotional, sexual and financial abuse.



Physical Abuse

Physical abuse is the most recognisable form of abuse. Perpetrators often use physical force, their body or other objects to injure the girl or woman. It does not always leave visible marks or scars. Do not underestimate or ignore what is happening to you, because, over time, the violence usually gets worse.

  1. Your partner / other family members tie you up, burn you, set fire to you, pull your hair, bang your head against a surface, throw things at you, or inflict cuts on you.

  2. Your partner / other family members lock you in the house.

  3. Your partner / other family members lock you out of the house during an argument.

  4. Your partner / other family members prevent you from going out of the house on your own.


Emotional Abuse

Many women experience domestic violence without ever being physically abused. If you change or adjust your behaviour because you are frightened of how your partner/ other family members will react, you are being abused. Emotional abuse is an attack on your personality rather than your body.

  1. Your partner and / or other family members cause you to fear them.

  2. Your partner and / or other family members cause you to change your behaviour to avoid triggering an attack.

  3. Your partner and / or other family members isolate you and cut you off from family and friends.

  4. Your partner / other family members have threatened to hurt you or people close to you.

  5. Your partner / other family members threaten to harm or kill the children, or threaten to kidnap or get custody of the children.

  6. Your partner / other family members use abusive language when talking to you, humiliate or insult you, call you names or make fun of you in a way that is designed to hurt you.

  7. Your partner / other family members dictate how you should dress and look.

  8. Your partner / other family members constantly criticise you, say you are useless and cannot cope without them.

  9. Your partner / other family members continuously doubt you and constantly suspect you of having affairs or being unfaithful.

  10. Your partner is jealous, possessive and over-protective.


Sexual Abuse

Your partner should not use force or threaten you to have sex. He should not make you perform sexual acts that make you uncomfortable. He should not criticise your performance. If he does any of the above, he is using sex to assert his authority and control over you.

  1. Your partner has forced sexual intercourse with you.

  2. Your partner forces you to engage in sexual acts that you are not comfortable with.

  3. Your partner deprives you of sexual relations.

  4. Your partner or family member(s) forces you to have sexual relationships with other people.


Financial Abuse

One of the most powerful ways a man can control his partner is through financial abuse. There are many different forms of financial abuse, but it might include things like your partner taking your money, stopping you from working or placing all the bills or debts in your name. If you feel that your partner is limiting your financial independence, you are experiencing financial abuse.

  1. Your partner / other family members control your money.

  2. Your partner / other family members ask you for a paise-wise account of your expenses.

  3. Your partner / other family members deprive you of money or do not give you enough money.

  4. Your partner / other family members prevent you from taking up a job.

  5. Your partner / other family members have taken away your gold and/or other gifts that you may have received prior to or during your marriage.

If you are facing domestic abuse, you are entitled to legal rights safeguarded by The Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, 2005.

How SNEHA Can Help


SNEHA helps women and girls facing domestic violence, sexual violence and sexual harassment, and children facing sexual abuse.



Immediate relief


  • Emotional support

  • Assistance in contacting police or doctors

  • Shelter

Long term services


  • Individual, family and couple counselling

  • Legal counselling

  • Psychiatric services

  • Psycho-therapeutic services

SNEHA ensures the confidentiality of every survivor of violence. Contact Us